Well, that’s effective.

or not.

Last week the Pew Research Center held a briefing on their newest study on Millennials. I had first learned about this briefing via Twitter, so I started to watch the streaming video online. I was disappointed yet not surprised to find out that not only were most of the presenters old white guys, but according to a few colleagues of mine, they weren’t in attendance either:

As it turns out however, fellow Millennial Decker Ngongang was one of the few in attendance. He let us know via Twitter that the briefing was not only invite-only (ha!) but also that virtually all the presenters were old enough to be our dads as were the attendees.

So how is it that old white guys are suited to comment on how they think we “kids” live our lives? (Paul Taylor kept referring to Millennials as “kids” when many of us are actually grown adults, as Rosetta Thurman so eloquently pointed out.) By not inviting Gen Y folks to come to your event or even to present the study, Pew is sending the message that they have no problem probing and theorizing about us but DO have a problem with us being present when they present the data, which I have an issue with.

Now of course there were some exceptions to the rule. In fact, someone did tell me that there was one 27 year old in attendance, and my friend Decker was there. But to them I said the following:

Pew’s first mistake was making the event invite-only (which is rare of them apparently). Their second mistake was doing a whole briefing about Millennials and only inviting a few of the “important” ones rather than reaching out to, say, Gen Y bloggers like myself and others and perhaps some folks from their networks who fit in that age group. Thirdly, making all the presenters old white males didn’t help either.

The findings themselves were pretty interesting as well and seemed to tell the story of the privileged Millennial, which of course is an entirely different post.

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